TRS_Blog_DTOP_BelowTitle_336x280

At 2:16, I Learned the Beauty of a Supercell Storm…

In June of 2013, storm-chaser Brad Hannon filmed a supercell thunderstorm that occurred near Booker, Texas. Of the storm, Hannon says, “…in combination with the landscape and setting sun, I witnessed some of the most amazing storm structures, colors, and scenes I’ve ever witnessed.”

A supercell is a thunderstorm characterized by a deep persistently rotating updraft. Low-pressure supercell thunderstorms, like the one seen in the video, are often found in arid regions, like the high plains of the United States. Supercell thunderstorms are considered quasi-steady-state storms, meaning they are capable of lasting a number of hours. They vary greatly in size and depending on severity of the storm, they can produce hail, torrential rainfall, strong winds, and downbursts.

Supercell’s are a relatively common occurrence but no matter how many times you’ve seen one, the weather event will leave you speechless. Watch the true power and beauty of a developing supercell in the video below!

Proper TRS rainforestsite_abovevideo
Lockerdome TRS – desktop
Proper TRS rainforestsite_belowcontent
The Rainforest Site is a place where people can come together to protect our environment for generations to come. In addition to signing important environmental petitions, shopping for the cause, and learning about the natural world, visitors can take just a moment each day to click on a green button to preserve vital wildlife habitat. Visit The Rainforest Site and click today - it's free!