WATCH: An Extremely Close Encounter With A Hungry Great White Shark

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Great white sharks are some of the most feared predators in the ocean, at least for us humans. Despite the fact that shark attacks are actually very rare, the fear of these massive creatures is always on the higher end of the spectrum. But when you get to see them up close and personal, it’s a little hard to keep calm.

Just off the coast of Long Beach, New York, a couple fishermen were out on their boat and stumbled across the rare sight of a huge whale carcass floating at the surface.

Rumble/Michael Maiale

Rumble/Michael Maiale

And even more unexpectedly, they found a great white shark in the midst of getting a meal.

As the fishermen approached the predator and its food, the shark came perilously close to their boat, making for one of the most perfect video opportunities.

Sharks in the east coast area are usually making their way north towards Cape Cod in search of food along the way. With a diet consisting of mostly fish and squid, coming across a whale carcass must have been like finding a fillet mignon for this great white.

Rumble/Michael Maiale

Rumble/Michael Maiale

Scenes like this don’t come around very often, but when they do, they make for an incredible sight that is usually much more comfortably witnessed in front of your computer at home instead of face to face with 300 sharp teeth.

If you do happen to find yourself out in the ocean with a great white shark like this, it is best to observe from a safe distance and make sure to stay calm, because in reality these sharks have better things to do than worry about people.

Check out the incredible footage in the video below and just be glad you aren’t in the water!

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