What a Sweet Gig: Artist Creates Portraits Made of Jelly Beans

Artists are creative people to begin with, but there are a select few who take it to the next level. Kristen Cumings is one of those artists. The fact she has done a recreation of the Girl With A Pearl Earring is impressive enough, but what really demonstrates her unique style is she recreated the famous painting using jelly beans!
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If you have a sweet tooth, you're certainly going to enjoy stepping into Cumings' studio. Every artist has her own creative process, and for Cumings, that involves a whole lot more than just placing thousands of jelly beans on a canvas. It actually starts with her taking a close look at a reference photo to get an idea of where she's going to put each jelly bean. Next, it's time for her to prepare her base, which involves painting the reference photo onto the canvas using acrylics. The jelly beans aren't something she uses as a substitute for painting, they're an addition to it.

According to Oddity Central, Cumings goes through between 8,000 and 12,000 jelly beans for each 4 by 6 foot mural. She keeps the jelly beans in place using a spray adhesive, and she spends over 50 hours on all her pieces. The jelly beans create a unique effect, as they make each piece appear somewhat three-dimensional. In case you were wondering, yes, she eats her mistakes, an added benefit of her chosen medium.
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Cumings starts with the most important features of the photo, and then works her way up from the bottom. Her method really has to be seen to be believed, and she describes her process while creating a jelly bean grizzly bear in this video.

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What other types of unusual art materials have you seen?

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