Meet the World’s Most Beautiful Birds

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Earth has remarkable diversity when it comes to birds. Some of these graceful creatures have the most beautiful feather patterns that contain bright layers of color. Read on to see some of these marvelous birds.

Gouldian Finch

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Gouldian finches, from Australia, take one of top prizes in nature for the most colors on a single animal. Expect to find yellow, white, red, green, blue, purple, orange, and black on various parts of this bird.

Mandarin Duck

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Mandarin ducks live in East Asia. Males have magnificent reddish-brown feathers on the chin and purple feathers on the breast.

Bird of Paradise

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The bird of paradise hails from the island of New Guinea. Males have brilliant plumage, and these feathers once adorned women’s hats.

Quetzal

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Quetzals live in the rainforests of Central America where they munch on small lizards, insects, and fruits.

Keel-Billed Toucan

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The keel-billed toucan shows a striking yellow breast, black feathers on its body, followed by black and red by its tail. Most people remember this bird for its huge, multicolored beak, which they use for eating eggs, insects, and lizards.

Australian King Parrot

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The Australian king parrot might make a good stop light impression. This bird has bright red on its breast and green on its back.

Scarlet Macaw

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Scarlet macaws live in South America where they love to eat nuts and seeds. Behind the powerful beak sits red feathers on the head and breast, and then green, blue, and yellow along this parrot’s wings.

Peacock

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The peacock has bright blue around most of its body, but the huge display of long feathers on the back are what make this one of the most colorful birds on Earth. Read how these impressive displays of color help males attract mates.

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